Beachwood Police Department


BEACHWOOD POLICE DEPARTMENT'S
Office of Emergency Management


IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY
DIAL: 9-1-1

FOR ALL OTHER CALLS
DIAL: 732-341-1249

MUNICIPAL OFFICES
DIAL: 732-286-6000

GPU ENERGY
DIAL: 1-800-662-3115 (Power Outages)

N.J. NATURAL GAS
DIAL: 1-800-221-0051

WEATHER
DIAL: 732-976-1212

COMMUNITY MEDICAL CENTER
DIAL: 732-240-8000

KIMBALL MEDICAL CENTER
DIAL: 732-996-4405

AMERICAN RED CROSS
DIAL: 732-741-3443

BEACHWOOD OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
DIAL: 732-286-6000, EXT. 111

OCEAN COUNTY OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
DIAL: 732-341-3451

N J DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
24-HOUR HOTLINE
DIAL: 609-292-7172



FOUR STEPS TO SAFETY

1. FIND OUT WHAT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU:
Contact your local Emergency Management Office and the American Red Cross - Be prepared to take notes.

    A - Ask what types of disasters are most likely to happen. Request information on how to prepare for each.
    B - Animals may not be allowed inside emergency shelters due to health regulations.
    C - Find out about the disaster plans at your workplace, your children's school or day care center and other places where your family spends time.

2. CREATE A DISASTER PLAN
Meet with your family and discuss why you need to plan for a disaster. Explain the dangers of fire, severe weather and earthquakes to children. Plan to share responsibilities and work together as a team.

    A - Discuss the types of disasters that are most likely to happen. Explain what to do in such cases.
    B - Pick two (2) places to meet:

    1. Right outside your home in case of sudden emergency, like fire.
    2. Outside your neighborhood, in case you can't return home. Everyone must know the address and phone number.
    C - Ask an out-of-state friend to be your "family contact". After a disaster, it's often easier to call long distance. Other family members should call this person and tell them where they are. Everyone in the family must know your contact's phone number.
    D - Discuss what to do in an evacuation. Plan how to take care of your pets.

3. COMPLETE THE CHECKLIST
    A - Post emergency telephone numbers by phones.
    B - Teach your children how and when to call 9-1-1 or your local police number for emergency help.
    C - Check to see if you have adequate insurance coverage
    D - Teach each family member how to use the fire extinguisher and show them where it is kept.
    E - Install smoke detectors on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms.
    F - Conduct a home hazard hunt.
    G -Stock emergency supplies and assemble a Disaster Supply Kit.
    H - Take a Red Cross First Aid and CPR class.
    I - Determine the best escape routes from your home. Find two (2) ways out of each room.
    J - Find the safe spots in your home for each type of disaster.

4. PRACTICE AND MAINTAIN YOUR PLAN
    A - Quiz your children every six (6) months so they remember what to do.
    B - Conduct fire and emergency evacuation drills.
    J - Test and recharge your fire extinguisher(s).
    J - Test your smoke detectors monthly and change the batteries at least once a year.



HURRICANES

WHAT TO DO BEFORE A HURRICANE:
1. Know the advisories issued by forecasters, which describes the location, strength and movement of the hurricane.

    A - HURRICANE WATCH - Means the hurricane conditions pose a possible threat to your area; it does not mean they are imminent.

    B - HURRICANE WARNING - is issued when a hurricane is expected to strike within twenty-four hours. Areas subject to storm surges and flooding may be evacuated on the advice of local authorities.

2. Be prepared for possible evacuation.



WHAT TO DO DURING A HURRICANE THREAT:

1. Listen for hurricane warnings on TV and radio.

2. During a Hurricane Watch, you should:

    A - Follow instructions by your local authorities.
    B - Cover windows with tape or boards.
    C - Secure outdoor objects.
    D - Fuel your car.
    E - Prepare an evacuation kit.
    F - Wedge sliding glass doors to prevent them from lifting from the tracks.

3. Be prepared to evacuate.

4. When advised to evacuate:

    A - Travel with care. Take necessary medication with you.
    B - Leave early enough to avoid flooding, fallen trees or downed power lines.

5. If authorities do not recommend evacuation, stay indoors and away from windows. Do not be fooled if there is a lull - it could be the eye of the storm. The wind will pick up again.

6. Avoid using the telephone except for emergencies.



WHAT TO DO AFTER A HURRICANE:

1. Remain in your shelter or home until informed by local authorities that it is safe to leave.
2. Keep tuned to local radio or TV stations for advice and instructions from your local government about medical help, emergency housing, clothing, or food assistance.
3. Stay away from disaster areas.
4. Drive only when necessary. Streets will be filled with debris and possibly downed power lines .



EMERGENCY CHECK LIST

Your Emergency Management Team is advising you that when you are told of a pending emergency or disaster, you should have an Emergency Evacuation Kit prepared. It should consist of the following items:
1. A pillow and blanket for every person being evacuated.
2. Some canned goods to share in mass feeding.
3. A battery operated radio and extra batteries.
4. Any medication needed by family members.
5. Personal items, such as toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap, deodorant, etc.
6. First aid kit.
7. Coloring books and crayons for kids.
8. A metal box containing:
    • social security cards
    • birth certificates
    • marriage and death certificates
    • driver's licenses
    • cash and credit cards
    • wills
    • insurance papers
    • deeds
    • stocks and bonds
    • savings and checking account books
    • small valuables, such as photos, watches, jewelry, etc.
(If packed correctly, this can be put into a small cardboard box so it can be evacuated with you and your family.)




IF DISASTER STRIKES

    A - IF DISASTER STRIKES: Remain calm and patient. Put your plan into action.
    B - CHECK FOR INJURIES: Give first aid and get help for seriously injured people.
    C - LISTEN TO YOUR BATTERY POWERED RADIO FOR NEWS AND INSTRUCTIONS: Evacuate if advised to do so. Wear protective clothing and sturdy shoes.
    D - CHECK FOR DAMAGE IN YOUR HOME:
      • Use flashlights - do not light matches or turn on electrical switches if you expect damage.
      • Check for fires, fire hazards and other household hazards.
      • Sniff for gas leaks starting at the water heater. If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open windows and get everyone outside quickly.
      • Shut off any other damaged utilities.
      • Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches, gasoline and other flammable liquids immediately.
    E - REMEMBER TO:
      • Confine or secure your pets.
      • Call your family contact - do not use the telephone again unless it is a life threatening emergency
      • Check on your neighbors, especially elderly or disabled persons.
      • Make sure you have an adequate supply of water in case service is cut off.
      • Stay away from downed power lines.
EVACUATION

    1. FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS AND ADVICE OF YOUR LOCAL GOVERNMENT. - If you are advised to evacuate, do so promptly. If you are instructed to move to a certain location, go there - don't go anywhere else.

    2. SECURE YOUR HOME BEFORE LEAVING. - If you have time and you have not received other instructions from your local government, you should take the following actions before leaving home:

    A. - Bring outside possessions inside the house or secure them outside.
    B. - Disconnect any electrical appliances or equipment that cannot be moved but don't touch them if you are standing in water.
    C. - Lock house doors and windows.

    3. TRAVEL WITH CARE.

      A. - Leave early enough to avoid being marooned by flooded road.
      B. - Make sure you have enough gasoline in your car.
      C. - Follow the recommended routes.
      D. - As you travel, keep listening to the radio for additional information and instructions from your local government.
      E. - Watch for washed out or undermined roadways, earth slides, broken sewer or water mains, loose or downed electrical wires and falling or fallen objects.
      F. - Watch out for areas where rivers or streams may flood suddenly.
      G. - Don't try to cross a stream or a pool unless you are certain that the water will not be over your knees or above the middle of your car's wheels all the way across. If you decide that it is safe to drive across it, put your car in low gear and drive very slowly to avoid splashing water into your engine, causing it to stop. Also, your brakes may not work well after the wheels of your car have been deep in water. Try them out a few times when you reach the other side.



    **For additional information regarding Disaster and Terrorism Preparedness visit the Federal Emergency Management Site: FEMA



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